GOP

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Faux Outrage Over Trump

trump-apology
Donald Trump’s latest has generated a faux outrage. He is running out of voters to which appeal. /screenshot

It was 20 years ago that former senator and GOP presidential candidate Bob Dole asked, “Where’s the outrage? When will the voters start to focus?” during his campaign against Bill Clinton, then running for a second term. (And that was before Monica Lewinsky.)

Today the public has turned the tables, asking the GOP where’s the outrage in connection with their candidate Donald Trump‘s latest offense du jour.

Straight to the point: It is calculated faux outrage, for the Republican Party has known all along that Trump does not measure up to past presidential candidates, especially their own.

Down the Escalator

From day one, when Trump rode the down escalator – how’s that for symbolism? – of Trump Tower in New York to announce his candidacy, a string of offenses have livestreamed from his mouth. That includes his initial shot against undocumented immigration and Mexicans, in particular, whom he said were criminals and rapists, followed by “and some I assume are good people,” as if the latter statement erased the former. It does not.

So what’s different now? His pussy riot is so offensive that it risks totally alienating female voters, who – lest we forget – comprise more than half the U.S. electorate

Women vote. That’s it right there. Women vote and most times in higher ratios than men. They may be undecided about Hillary Clinton, but increasingly they are lining up against Trump, who may take the down ballot with him in a potential presidential defeat. Congress, Senate, state and local candidates.

So just weeks before the November 8 elections, the GOP is trying to salvage voters. But it’s too late.  Trump cannot be walked back. He is what he is and the GOP cannot recall its candidate.

Big Miscalculation

The Trump-GOP miscalculation is bigger than each of them. Trump’s perception and treatment of women is degrading and predatory, possibly tipping the scales against the GOP.

But there’s no real outrage here. The party coldly and strategically (mis)calculated that it didn’t need the black vote. Or the Latino vote. Or the Muslim voter. Or the disabled voter.

It thought it could pick up other voters along the way:  more white men, maybe more white women, more working class voters.

The latest Trumpism is destroying those prospects.

˜˜Maria Padilla, Editor